Welcome to Dive Log Australasia

Dive Log is the premier scuba diving monthly magazine that provides all the latest scuba news and information from across Australia and the Asia/Pacific region. You can read our monthly magazine free by clicking on the Latest Edition tab, download the iPad application at a low cost of $2.99 or find it at your nearest Newsagent for $4.95. Dive Log is also available at selected dive stores. Each month we look at the key issues that effect us all as divers as well as look at great diving locations in the region as well as the perfect scuba diving holiday destinations. We also review the latest diving equipment and gear and scuba courses and certifications, to ensure you are always up to date with the latest and best things happening in the scuba diving industry.

AS WE GET OLDER WE BUBBLE MORE
By PETER BUZZACOTT MPH, PhD




MAGNIFICENT GREY
NURSE SHARKS
By GRAHAM WILLIS



LISSENUNGS EPIC
ADVENTURE
By MIKE SCOTLAND

In my job, researching diving injuries and decompression, sometimes I see a caution in medical papers about how a study was based on military divers and the results may not apply to ordinary recreational divers. For example, some decompression algorithms were tested on Navy divers. Whenever I see this I wonder, what’s the difference?

To highlight a few of the differences between military and recreational divers I’ll describe here two papers written by my Belgian friend Dr Kate Lambrechts, examining the endothelium before and after scuba diving.1,2


This article is a really a chance to see some shark photos in Dive Log (and who doesn’t love a shark photo?) but also to learn a few things about our Grey Nurse friends. This information is all publicly sourced and as I go through the article I’ve added a couple of places you might want to visit if you want to find out more.

Did you know, for instance, that the Grey Nurse (Carcharius Taurus) became the very first protected shark in the world when the New South Wales Government declared it a protected species in 1984? I didn’t…


I watch in the total darkness the world’s deadliest Cone shell out hunting. This magnificent Geographical cone is huge and moves with blistering speed for a snail. I recall that there are many human deaths attributed to this lethal Mollusc. To observe this most dangerous of killers hunting is nothing short of sheer brilliance. I sense my fingers making their own way deep into my armpits for that extra protection as if by some involuntary magic of their own survival instincts. I feel a shudder down my spine.

This huge Cone shell is on a mission, probably following the scent of a Blenny …

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